The Corinthian Letters

Folio from Papyrus 46, circa 175–225 C.E. Papyrus, Chester Beatty Library, Dublin / University of Michigan Papyrus Collection, Ann Arbor.

Papyrus 46 (P46) is one of the oldest extant Greek manuscripts of the New Testament. Written on papyrus, the folio contains most of the Pauline epistles. This folio contains 2Cor 11:33-12:9. The document uses the abbreviated version of common divine names and words, a type of writing that began in the first century C.E. and referred to as nomina sacra. Words such as God, Jesus, cross, mother, Israel, and heaven are shortened from their conventional Greek. Of New Testament documents of roughly the same period, P46 makes extremely extensive use of nomina sacra.

Folio from Papyrus 46, containing 2 Corinthians 11:33–12:9, circa 175–225 C.E. Chester Beatty Library, Dublin / University of Michigan Papyrus Collection, Ann Arbor.

Characteristic of a deity (a god or goddess).

Still in existence.

Textual documents, usually handwritten.

A collection of first-century Jewish and early Christian writings that, along with the Old Testament, makes up the Christian Bible.

2Cor 11:33-12:9

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