Philippi Cult Temple

The entrance to an imperial cult temple in the northeast corner of the forum. The temple contained statues of members of the imperial family.

The Romans built the Via Egnatia to connect Philippi to the ports of the Adriatic Sea in the west and to Byzantium in the east. The Roman site at the foot of the acropolis includes two bathhouses, a forum, a temple dedicated to the emperor, an aqueduct, and inscriptions in Latin. There is also a temple for the Egyptian gods Isis, Serapis, and Harpocrates, which indicates the international orientation of this town. Another foreign religion represented in the city was Judaism; in 49 or 50 C.E., the apostle Paul of Tarsus met a community of Christians there, and he stayed in Philippi for some time.

philippi-cult-site

A system of religious worship, or cultus (e.g., the Israelite cult). Also refers to adherents of that system.

A form of religion, most notable in ancient Rome, where emperors were worshipped as literal gods or demi-gods.

Short written texts, generally inscribed on stone or clay and frequently recording an event or dedicating an object.

Short written texts, generally inscribed on stone or clay and frequently recording an event or dedicating an object.

A powerful ancient Egyptian goddess whose purview included maternity, magic, and the Pharaoh's lineage.

The religion and culture of Jews. It emerged as the descendant of ancient Israelite Religion, and is characterized by monotheism and an adherence to the laws present in the Written Torah (the Bible) and the Oral Torah (Talmudic/Rabbinic tradition).

A Greco-Egyptian god invented by Ptolemy I of Egypt in the third century B.C.E. in an attempt at unifiying the Greek and Egyptian peoples of his empire.

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