The Temple of Solomon and Its Courts

Heinrich Bünting, The Temple of Solomon and Its Courts, 1585. From Itinerarium Sacrae Scripturae, part 1 (Helmstadt: Jacobus Lucius, 1585), 34–35. Jewish National and University Library, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

The Itinerarium Sacrae Scripturae was first published in 1581 in Northern Europe. The book provided a summary of biblical geography by following the travels of various people from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. It was illustrated by woodcut maps and city views. Because the printing of movable type, like the woodcut, is a relief process, woodcuts were ideally suited for illustrating early European printed books. The woodblocks could be placed alongside the type in the flatbed press and printed at the same time.

Heinrich Bünting, The Temple of Solomon and Its Courts, 1585. From Itinerarium Sacrae Scripturae, part 1 (Helmstadt: Jacobus Lucius, 1585), 34–35. Jewish National and University Library, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

A West Semitic language, in which most of the Hebrew Bible is written except for parts of Daniel and Ezra. Hebrew is regarded as the spoken language of ancient Israel but is largely replaced by Aramaic in the Persian period.

The set of Biblical books shared by Jews and Christians. A more neutral alternative to "Old Testament."

A collection of first-century Jewish and early Christian writings that, along with the Old Testament, makes up the Christian Bible.

 NEH Logo
Bible Odyssey has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this website, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.